Mobile Jargon

Posted: February 7, 2010 in Mobiles, Under the hood
Tags: , , , ,

Burst that Jargon: GSM, CDMA, 1G, 3G, Wifi and what not? The list just seems to be never ending. People talk so much about these, even then when I look around I realised that there is still whole lot of people for whom this is a Greek. So here is my humble effort to make all more techno savvy:

This first generation (1G) analog system for mobile communications saw two key improvements during the 1970s: the invention of the microprocessor and the digitization of the control link between the mobilephone and the cell site.

Second generation (2G) digital cellular systems were first developed at the end of the 1980s.  These systems digitized not only the control link but also the voice signal.  The new system provided better quality and higher capacity at lower cost to consumers.

Third generation (3G) systems promise faster communications services, including voice, fax and Internet,  anytime and anywhere with seamless global roaming.  ITU’s  IMT-2000 global standard for 3G has opened the way to enabling innovative applications and services (e.g. multimedia entertainment, infotainment and location-based services, among others). The first 3G network was deployed in Japan in 2001.  2.5G networks, such as GPRS (Global Packet Radio Service) are already available in some parts of Europe.
Read more about 3G Here

Wi-Fi, which stands for wireless fidelity, in a play on the older term Hi-Fi, is a wireless networking technology used across the globe. Wi-Fi refers to any system that uses the 802.11 standard, which was developed by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and released in 1997. The term Wi-Fi, which is alternatively spelled WiFi, Wi-fi, Wifi, or wifi, was pushed by the Wi-Fi Alliance, a trade group that pioneered commercialization of the technology.

In a Wi-Fi network, computers with wifi network cards connect wirelessly to a wireless router. The router is connected to the Internet by means of a modem, typically a cable or DSL modem. Any user within 200 feet or so (about 61 meters) of the access point can then connect to the Internet, though for good transfer rates, distances of 100 feet (30.5 meters) or less are more common. Retailers also sell wireless signal boosters that extend the range of a wireless network.

Wifi networks can either be “open”, such that anyone can use them, or “closed”, in which case a password is needed. An area blanketed in wireless access is often called a wireless hotspot. There are efforts underway to turn entire cities, such as San Francisco, Portland, and Philadelphia, into big wireless hotspots. Many of these plans will offer free, ad-supported service or ad-free service for a small fee. San Francisco recently chose Google to supply it with a wireless network.

Wifi technology uses radio for communication, typically operating at a frequency of 2.4GHz. Electronics that are “WiFi Certified” are guaranteed to interoperate with each other regardless of brand. Wifi is technology designed to cater to the lightweight computing systems of the future, which are mobile and designed to consume minimal power. PDAs, laptops, and various accessories are designed to be wifi-compatible. There are even phones under development that would switch seamlessly from cellular networks to wifi networks without dropping a call.

Will Continue in the next part.  Thanks for reading. Your suggestion and questions makes me better and spread knowledge. Visit again.

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Comments
  1. […] the common mobile related terms. Hope you have read the first two series. If not the click here for Part1 and Part2. I have tried my best to keep the things simple.  Read […]

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